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Should You File an Amended Tax Return? + 10 Tips for Filing an Amended Tax Return

 

If you enrolled in qualifying Marketplace health coverage, you have probably filed a tax return based on a Form 1095-A that you received from the Marketplace.

 

Your Marketplace may have subsequently told you that your original Form 1095-A contained an error, and sent a corrected Form 1095-A.

You do not need to file an amended return based on your corrected Form 1095-A. This is true even if additional taxes would be owed based on the new information. Nonetheless, you may choose to file an amended return. Comparing the forms can help you determine whether you are likely to benefit from filing an amended tax return.

Specifically, you are likely to receive a larger refund or owe a smaller tax payment using the corrected Form 1095-A if the two Forms 1095-A generally show the same information but any one of the five scenarios below is true on the corrected form.

1. Second Lowest Cost Silver Plan Premium is Larger: The monthly premium amounts of the second lowest cost silver plan, shown in Part III, column B, lines 21-32, are greater on the corrected form than on the original form.

2. Monthly Premium Amounts are Larger: The monthly premium amounts of the plan in which you enrolled, shown in Part III, column A, lines 21-32, are greater on the corrected form than on the original form.

3. Advance Payment of the Premium Tax Credit Amounts are Lower: The monthly amounts of advance payment of the premium tax credit shown in Part III, column C, lines 21-32 are smaller on the corrected form than on the original form.

4. More Months of Coverage: Your corrected Form 1095-A lists more months of coverage and your situation meets all the following conditions:

 > The corrected form shows more months of coverage than the original form. This means that the corrected form shows positive values in more of the rows under Part III than the original form.


 > The values are the same on the corrected form for the months that the original form showed coverage.
 

 > On your original tax return, you claimed a net premium tax credit, meaning you entered a value on line 26 of the Form 8962 you filed.
 

5. Fewer Months of Coverage: Your corrected From 1095-A lists fewer months of coverage and your situation meets all the following conditions:

 > The corrected form shows fewer months of coverage than the original form. This means that the corrected form shows positive values in fewer of the rows under Part III than the original form.


 > The values are the same on the original form for the months that the corrected form shows coverage.
 

 > On your original tax return, you reported owing a repayment of excess APTC, meaning you entered a value on line 29 of the Form 8962 you filed.
 

If there were multiple differences between your original and the corrected forms or you are not sure if you would benefit from amending, you may want to consult with a tax preparer:

For more information contact our office or go online to the IRS website under Questions and Answers - Incorrect Forms 1095-A and the Premium Tax Credit.

 


 

         10 Tips for Filing an Amended Return

Have you found that you made an error on your federal tax return? If so, you may need to file an amended return. Here are ten tips that can help you file.

1. Tax form to amend your return. Use Form 1040X, Amended U.S. Individual Income Tax Return, to correct your tax return. You must file a paper Form 1040X; it canít be e-filed. You can get the form on IRS.gov/forms at any time. See the Form 1040X instructions for the address where you should mail your form.

2. Amend to correct errors. You should file an amended tax return to correct errors or make changes to your original tax return. For example, you should amend to change your filing status, or to correct your income, deductions or credits.

3. Donít amend for math errors, missing forms. You normally donít need to file an amended return to correct math errors. The IRS will automatically correct those for you. Also, do not file an amended return if you forgot to attach tax forms, such as a Form W-2 or a schedule. The IRS will mail you a request for them in most cases.

4. Most taxpayers donít need to amend to correct Form 1095-A, Health Insurance Marketplace Statement, errors. Eligible taxpayers who filed a 2014 tax return and claimed a premium tax credit using incorrect information from either the federally-facilitated or a state-based Health Insurance Marketplace, generally do not have to file an amended return regardless of the nature of the error, even if additional taxes would be owed. The IRS may contact you to ask for a copy of your corrected Form 1095-A to verify the information.

5. Time limit to claim a refund. You usually have three years from the date you filed your original tax return to file Form 1040X to claim a refund. You can file it within two years from the date you paid the tax, if that date is later. That means the last day for most people to file a 2011 claim for a refund is April 15, 2015. See the Form 1040X instructions for special rules that apply to some claims.

6. Separate forms for each year. If you are amending more than one tax return, prepare a 1040X for each year. You should mail each year in separate envelopes. Note the tax year of the return you are amending at the top of Form 1040X. Check the formís instructions for where to mail your return.

7. Attach other forms with changes. If you use other IRS forms or schedules to make changes, make sure to attach them to your Form 1040X.

8. When to file for second refund. If you are due a refund from your original return, wait to get that refund before filing Form 1040X to claim an additional refund. Amended returns take up to 16 weeks to process. You may spend your original refund while you wait for any additional refund.

9. Pay added tax as soon as you can. If you owe more tax, file your Form 1040X and pay the tax as soon as you can. This will stop added interest and penalties. Use IRS Direct Pay to pay your tax directly from your checking or savings account.

10. Track your amended return. You can track the status of your amended tax return three weeks after you file with ĎWhereís My Amended Return?í This tool is on IRS.gov or by phone at 866-464-2050. It is available in English and in Spanish. The tool can track the status of an amended return for the current year and up to three years back. To use ĎWhereís My Amended Return?í enter your taxpayer identification number, which is usually your Social Security number. You will also enter your date of birth and zip code. If you have filed amended returns for multiple years, you can check each year one at a time.

 

If you have comments or questions on the information in these articles, as usual feel free to call our offices at 801-521-4538.

 

Ray Clark, CPA, MBA

 

Ray Clark, CPA, MBA | Clark & Clark PC | 203 East 800 South | Salt Lake City, UT 84111 | 801-521-4538 | staff@clarkaccountingcpa.com

 

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