Julie Jeffers | Jeffers & Company | 1635 Hawthorne Drive, Plainfield, IN 46168 | 317-837-7720

       




 

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This Month's Feature Articles

 

- Year-End Tax Planning for Individuals

- Year-End Tax Planning for Businesses

- Tax Benefits of Health Savings Accounts

- Making Tax Smart Loans to Family and Friends

- Section 199A: Qualified Business Income Deduction

 

Tax Tips

 

- Business Expense Deductions for Meals, Entertainment

- Understanding the Gift Tax

- The Health Care Law and Hiring Seasonal Workers

- Deferred Tax on Gains from Forced Sales of Livestock

- IRS Relief for Taxpayers Affected by Hurricanes





 

 








 

8 Tips to Understanding the Gift Tax


If you gave money or property to someone as a gift, you might owe federal gift tax.

 

Many gifts are not subject to the gift tax, but there are exceptions. Here are eight tips you can use to figure out whether your gift is taxable.

1. Most gifts are not subject to the gift tax. For example, there is usually no tax if you make a gift to your spouse or to a charity. If you make a gift to someone else, the gift tax usually does not apply until the value of the gifts you give that person exceeds the annual exclusion for the year. For 2018 the annual exclusion is $15,000 (up from $14,000 in 2017).

2. Gift tax returns do not need to be filed unless you give someone, other than your spouse, money or property worth more than the annual exclusion for that year.

3. Generally, the person who receives your gift will not have to pay any federal gift tax because of it. Also, that person will not have to pay income tax on the value of the gift received.

4. Making a gift does not ordinarily affect your federal income tax. You cannot deduct the value of gifts you make (other than deductible charitable contributions).

5. The general rule is that any gift is a taxable gift. However, there are many exceptions to this rule. The following gifts are not taxable gifts:

- Gifts that are do not exceed the annual exclusion for the calendar year,
- Tuition or medical expenses you pay directly to a medical or educational institution for someone,
- Gifts to your spouse,
- Gifts to a political organization for its use, and
- Gifts to charities.

6. You and your spouse can make a gift up to $30,000 to a third party without making a taxable gift. The gift can be considered as made one-half by you and one-half by your spouse.

 

If you split a gift you made, you must file a gift tax return to show that you and your spouse agree to use gift splitting. You must file a Form 709, United States Gift (and Generation-Skipping Transfer) Tax Return, even if half of the split gift is less than the annual exclusion.

7. You must file a gift tax return on Form 709 if any of the following apply:

- You gave gifts to at least one person (other than your spouse) that are more than the annual exclusion for the year.
- You and your spouse are splitting a gift.
- You gave someone (other than your spouse) a gift of a future interest that he or she cannot actually possess, enjoy, or receive income from until some time in the future.
- You gave your spouse an interest in property that will terminate due to a future event.

8. You do not have to file a gift tax return to report gifts to political organizations and gifts made by paying someone's tuition or medical expenses.

Questions about the gift tax? Don't hesitate to call.

Summary
These are good tips & guidelines to follow regarding GIFTS. Please contact the office for assistance with following these and other year-end planning strategies that might be suitable for your particular situation.

 

Don't hesitate to call us if you need help or want to get started on tax planning for the remainder of 2018 (or a jump start on 2019)!  If you have comments or questions on the information in these articles, as usual feel free to call our offices.  Thanks!  Julie Jeffers


Feel free to give us a call if you have a question about these topics or issues or if you need help or want to get started on tax planning for the rest of 2018!  If you have comments on the information in these articles, feel free to call our offices.

     

     
 
       
       

Julie Jeffers | Jeffers & Company | 1635 Hawthorne Drive, Plainfield, IN 46168 | 317-837-7720