Rebella Accountancy | 507 E. First Street, Suite A | Tustin, CA 92780 | Phone: 714-619-0667 | Fax: 714-544-0236

       

 

 

Monica Rebella, CPA/IAR - President

Rebella Accountancy

 

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Feature Articles

 

- President signs Highway Bill revising return due dates, making other compliance change

- Busy tax agenda awaits Congress’ return after August recess

- Developments continue to impact the mortgage interest deduction

- FAQ: When must individuals pay estimated taxes?

- How Do I? Form a partnership for tax purposes

- September 2015 tax compliance calendar

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10 Tax Tips about Filing an Amended Tax Return + Moving this Year? + Health Insurance Company May Ask for Social Security Number


 

We all make mistakes so don't panic if you made one on your tax return. You can file an amended return if you need to fix an error.

You can also amend your tax return if you forgot to claim a tax credit or deduction. Here are ten tips from the IRS if you need to amend your federal tax return.

1. When to amend. You should amend your tax return if you need to correct your filing status, the number of dependents you claimed, or your total income. You should also amend your return to claim tax deductions or tax credits that you did not claim when you filed your original return. The instructions for Form 1040X, Amended U.S. Individual Income Tax Return, list more reasons to amend a return.

Note: If, as allowed by recent legislation, you plan to amend your tax year 2014 return to retroactively claim the Health Coverage Tax Credit, see IRS.Gov/HCTC first for more information.

2. When NOT to amend. In some cases, you don't need to amend your tax return. The IRS usually corrects math errors when processing your original return. If you didn't include a required form or schedule, the IRS will send you a notice via U.S. mail about the missing item.

3. Form 1040X. Use Form 1040X to amend a federal income tax return that you filed before. Make sure you check the box at the top of the form that shows which year you are amending. Since you can't e-file an amended return, you'll need to file your Form 1040X on paper and mail it to the IRS.

Form 1040X has three columns. Column A shows amounts from the original return. Column B shows the net increase or decrease for the amounts you are changing. Column C shows the corrected amounts. You should explain what you are changing and the reasons why on the back of the form.

4. More than one year. If you file an amended return for more than one year, use a separate 1040X for each tax year. Mail them in separate envelopes to the IRS. See "Where to File" in the instructions for Form 1040X for the address you should use.

5. Other forms or schedules. If your changes have to do with other tax forms or schedules, make sure you attach them to Form 1040X when you file the form. If you don't, this will cause a delay in processing.

6. Amending to claim an additional refund. If you are waiting for a refund from your original tax return, don't file your amended return until after you receive the refund. You may cash the refund check from your original return. Amended returns take up to 16 weeks to process. You will receive any additional refund you are owed.



7. Amending to pay additional tax. If you're filing an amended tax return because you owe more tax, you should file Form 1040X and pay the tax as soon as possible. This will limit interest and penalty charges.

8. Corrected Forms 1095-A. If you or anyone on your return enrolled in qualifying health care coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace, you should have received a Form 1095-A, Health Insurance Marketplace Statement. You may have also received a corrected Form 1095-A. If you filed your tax return based on the original Form 1095-A, you do not need to file an amended return based on a corrected Form 1095-A. This is true even if you would owe additional taxes based on the new information. However, you may choose to file an amended return.

In some cases, the information on the new Form 1095-A may lower the amount of taxes you owe or increase your refund. You may also want to file an amended return if:

- You filed and incorrectly claimed a premium tax credit, or
- You filed an income tax return and failed to file Form 8962, Premium Tax Credit, to reconcile your advance payments of the premium tax credit.

Before amending your return, if you received a letter regarding your premium tax credit or Form 8962 you should follow the instructions in the letter.

9. When to file. To claim a refund file Form 1040X no more than three years from the date you filed your original tax return. You can also file it no more than two years from the date you paid the tax, if that date is later than the three-year rule.

10. Track your return. You can track the status of your amended tax return three weeks after you file with "Where's My Amended Return?" This tool is available on IRS.gov or by phone at 866-464-2050.

You can get Form 1040X on IRS.gov/forms at any time.

Each and every taxpayer has a set of fundamental rights they should be aware of when dealing with the IRS. These are your Taxpayer Bill of Rights. Explore your rights and our obligations to protect them on IRS.gov.

 

Last month in USA Today I was quoted in 2 articles on tax topics & if you missed it you can download the articles below.  Monica

9 Commonly Overlooked Tax Breaks by Jeff Reeves - Special to USA Today (click here to download) 9 Tax Tips For The Self Employed by Jeff Reeves - Special to USA Today (click here to download)

 


 

Moving this Year? If You Receive the Premium Tax Credit, Report this Life Event

 

If you moved recently, you've probably notified several organizations – like the U.S. Postal Service and utility companies – about your new address.

You may have even notified the IRS about your address change. If you get health insurance coverage through a Health Insurance Marketplace, you should add one more important notification to your list: the Marketplace.

If you are receiving advance payments of the premium tax credit, it is particularly important that you report changes in circumstances, including moving, to the Marketplace. There's a simple reason. Reporting your move lets the Marketplace update the information used to determine your eligibility for a Marketplace plan, which may affect the appropriate amount of advance payments of the premium tax credit that the government sends to your health insurer on your behalf.

Reporting the changes will help you avoid having too much or not enough premium assistance paid to reduce your monthly health insurance premiums. Getting too much premium assistance means you may owe additional money or get a smaller refund when you file your taxes. On the other hand, getting too little could mean missing out on monthly premium assistance that you deserve.

Changes in circumstances that you should report to the Marketplace include:

- an increase or decrease in your income, including lump sum payments like a lump sum payment of Social Security benefits
- marriage or divorce
- the birth or adoption of a child
- starting a job with health insurance
- gaining or losing your eligibility for other health care coverage

Many of these changes in circumstances – including moving out of the area served by your current Marketplace plan – qualify you for a special enrollment period to change or get insurance through the Marketplace. In most cases, if you qualify for the special enrollment period, you will have sixty days to enroll following the change in circumstances. You can find information about special enrollment periods at HealthCare.gov.

The Premium Tax Credit Change Estimator can help you estimate how your premium tax credit will change if you experience a change in circumstance during the year.

 



Your Health Insurance Company May Be Asking for Your Social Security Number

Your health insurance company may request that you provide them with the social security numbers for you, your spouse and your children covered by your policy.

This is because the Affordable Care Act requires every provider of minimum essential coverage to report that coverage by filing an information return with the IRS and furnishing a statement to covered individuals. The information is used by the IRS to administer – and individuals to show compliance with – the health care law.

Health coverage providers will file an information return, Form 1095-B, Health Coverage, with the IRS and will furnish statements to you in 2016, to report coverage information from calendar year 2015.

The law requires coverage providers to list social security numbers on this form. If you don't provide your SSN and the SSNs of all covered individuals to the sponsor of the coverage, the IRS may not be able to match the Form 1095-B with the individuals to determine that they have complied with the individual shared responsibility provision.

Your health insurance company may send a letter that discusses these new rules and requests social security numbers for all family members covered under your policy. The IRS has not designated a specific form for your health insurance company to request this information. The Form 1095-B will provide information for your income tax return that shows you, your spouse, and individuals you claim as dependents had qualifying health coverage for some or all months during the year. You do not have to attach Form 1095-B to your tax return. Keep it with your other important tax documents.

Anyone on your return who does not have minimum essential coverage, and who does not qualify for an exemption, may be liable for the individual shared responsibility payment.

The information received by the IRS will be used to verify information on your individual income tax return. If you refuse to provide this information to your health insurance company, the IRS cannot verify the information you provide on your tax return and you may receive an inquiry from the IRS. You also may receive a notice from the IRS indicating that you are liable for a shared responsibility payment.

For more information, see our Questions and Answers about Reporting Social Security Numbers to Your Health Insurance Company on IRS.gov/aca.

If you have comments or questions on the information in these articles, as usual feel free to call our offices.

 


 

 

   

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As always you can call me at 714-619-0667 if you have any questions about investing, retirement or any other tax & accounting related issues. 

 

Regards, Monica Rebella, CPA/IAR

President, Rebella Accountancy

 
Disclaimer:  The opinions contained herein are not intended to be investment advice or a solicitation to buy or sell any securities. With any investment you should carefully consider the investment objectives, potential risks, management fees, and charges and expenses before investing.  Past performance is not a guarantee of future results. The investment return and principle value of any investment will fluctuate so that an investor's shares, when redeemed, may be worth more or less than their original cost.

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Monica Rebella, CPA/IAR | President - Rebella Accountancy | Certified Public Accountants
507 E. First Street, Suite A | Tustin, CA 92780 | Phone: 714-619-0667 | Fax: 714-544-0236
Email: mrebella@rebellacpa.com | www.RebellaCPA.com | www.MyDentalCPA.com