Sullivan & Company - Certified Public Accountants 4709 Montgomery Lane #201 - Bethesda, MD, 20814 Phone: 301-657-8080

       

 

 

 

Financial Services by Sullivan & Company

Kathy Grow EA/IAR

Financial services are now offered at Sullivan & Co., CPAs.  The story WHY:

 

You may wonder why your accounting firm wants you to invest with them. Years ago, CPAs were not allowed to venture into the investment world, but it always bothered us to see how poorly our clients were treated at their broker. It is not that the broker was not nice or attentive; it was the quality of the investments and, oftentimes, the lack of understanding for how the investments were going to affect the client in the future.

 

The amount of commissions and fees were oftentimes much larger than the client realized. Principles taught in universities were ignored by greedy advisors. Some forward thinking CPAs worked hard to get the accounting industry to see that we could, at the least, counsel our clients so that their investing experience was successful.

 

Our function is to work with you in all areas of your financial life. We prepare your tax returns and financial statements, of course, but there's a lot more decisions you make that we should be involved in. These include: succession planning for business owners such as HOW TO:

1) Sell your business

2) Retire comfortably

3) Handle your finances now that you are divorced or widowed

4) Provide for loved ones if you die

5) Pay for the education of your children

6) Determine if a trust is right for you

7) Minimize estate taxes

 

Worse than hearing that the IRS is going to audit is the call from a client who has plunged into an investment, whether stocks, bonds or another home without consulting us first.

 

Sometimes these decisions have unfortunate results and are difficult or impossible to undo. So, in response to this need, your CPA firm has well trained accountants and financial services professionals to help you navigate the financial world..

For a free review of your investments, give me a call at 301 657-8080 X 135.

 


 

 

Paul Sullivan, CPA

Sullivan & Company

 

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This Month's Feature Articles

- Paying Taxes on Household Helpers
- What to Do if You Haven't Filed an Income Tax Return
- Turn Your Vacation into a Tax Deduction
- Choosing a Retirement Destination

 

Tax Tips

- Ten Facts on Filing an Amended Tax Return
- Eight Facts on Late Filing and Payment Penalties
- Tips for Tax-Exempt Organizations Filing Form 990
- Ten Tax Tips for Farmers



 

 

 

If your CPA isn't providing this type of information to you as a client each month (OR JUST CONTACTS YOU WHEN IT IS TAX TIME OR TO PAY YOUR BILL TO THEM) maybe it's time to talk with or switch to Paul Sullivan at Sullivan & Company CPAs. To set up an appointment to talk with Paul at 800-652-6521 or in Bethesda call 301-657-8080.

Paying Taxes on Household Helpers

 

If you employ someone to work for you around your house, it is important to consider the tax implications of this arrangement.

 

While many people disregard the need to pay taxes on household employees, they do so at the risk of paying stiff tax penalties down the road.

 

As you will see, the rules for hiring household help are quite complex, even for a relatively minor employee, and a mistake can bring on a tax headache that most of us would prefer to avoid.

 

Commonly referred to as the "nanny tax", these rules apply to you only if (1) you pay someone for household work and (2) that worker is your employee.

 

Household work is work that is performed in or around your home by baby-sitters, nannies, health aides, private nurses, maids, caretakers, yard workers, and similar domestic workers. A household worker is your employee if you control not only what work is done, but how it is done.

 

Who Is a Household Employee?

 

If a worker is your employee, it does not matter whether the work is full-time or part-time, or that you hired the worker through an agency or from a list provided by an agency or association. It also does not matter whether you pay the worker on an hourly, daily, or weekly basis, or by the job.

 

If the worker controls how the work is done, the worker is not your employee, but is self-employed. A self-employed worker usually provides his or her own tools and offers services to the general public in an independent business.

 

Also, if an agency provides the worker and controls what work is done and how it is done, the worker is not your employee.

 

Example: You pay Betty to babysit your child and do light housework four days a week in your home. Betty follows your specific instructions about household and child care duties. You provide the household equipment and supplies that Betty needs to do her work. Betty is your household employee.
Example: You pay John to care for your lawn. John also offers lawn care services to other homeowners in your neighborhood. He provides his own tools and supplies, and he hires and pays any helpers he needs. Neither John nor his helpers are your household employees.

 

 

Can Your Employee Legally Work in the United States?

 

When you hire a household employee to work for you on a regular basis, he or she must complete USCIS Form I-9 Employment Eligibility Verification. It is your responsibility to verify that the employee is either a U.S. citizen or an alien who can legally work and then complete the employer part of the form. It is unlawful for you to knowingly hire or continue to employ a person who cannot legally work in the United States.

 

 

Keep the completed form for your records. Do not return the form to the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS).

 

Tip: Two copies of Form I-9 are contained in the UCIS Employer Handbook. Visit the USCIS website or call 800-767-1833 to order the handbook, additional copies of the form, or to get more information, or give us a call.

 

 

Do You Need to Pay Employment Taxes?

 

If you have a household employee, you may need to withhold and pay Social Security and Medicare taxes, or you may need to pay federal unemployment tax, or both. Refer to this table for details:.
 


If you...

 

Will pay cash wages of $1,900 or more in 2014 to any one household employee.

 

Do not count wages you pay to:

 

 - your spouse,

 - your child under age 21,

 - your parent, or

 - any employee under age 18

    during 2014.

 

Have paid or will pay total cash wages of $1,000 or more in any calendar quarter of 2013 or 2014 to household employees.

 

Do not count wages you pay to:

 - your spouse,

 - your child under age 21, or

 - your parent.

 

Then you need to...

 

 - Withhold and pay Social Security and Medicare taxes.

 

 - The combined taxes are generally 15.3% of cash wages.

 

Your employee's share is 7.65%.

 

(You can choose to pay the employee's share yourself and not withhold it.)

 

 - Your share is 7.65%.

 

Pay federal unemployment tax.

 

 - The tax is 0.6% of cash wages.

 - Wages over $7,000 a year per employee are not taxed.

 - You also may owe state unemployment tax.

 

If neither of these two contingencies applies, you do not need to pay any federal unemployment taxes. But you may still need to pay state unemployment taxes (see below).

 

You do not need to withhold federal income tax from your household employee's wages. But if your employee asks you to withhold it, you can choose to do so.

 

Tip: If your household employee cares for your dependent that is under the age of 13 or your spouse or dependent that is not capable of self care, so that you can work, you may be able to take an income tax credit of up to 35 percent (or $1,050) of your expenses for each qualifying dependent. If you can take the credit, then you can include your share of the federal and state employment taxes you pay, as well as the employee's wages, in your qualifying expenses.

 

 


 

State Unemployment Taxes

 

Please contact us if you're not sure whether you need to pay state unemployment tax for your household employee. We'll also help you figure out whether you need to pay or collect other state employment taxes or carry workers' compensation insurance.

 

Note: If you do not need to pay Social Security, Medicare, or federal unemployment tax and do not choose to withhold federal income tax, the rest of this article does not apply to you.

 

Social Security and Medicare Taxes

 

Social Security taxes pays for old-age, survivor, and disability benefits for workers and their families. The Medicare tax pays for hospital insurance. Both you and your household employee may owe Social Security and Medicare taxes. Your share is 7.65 percent (6.2 percent for Social Security tax and 1.45 percent for Medicare tax) of the employee's Social Security and Medicare wages. Your employee's share is 6.2 percent for Social Security tax and 1.45 percent for Medicare tax. You are responsible for payment of your employee's share of the taxes as well as your own. You can either withhold your employee's share from the employee's wages or pay it from your own funds. Note the limits in the table above.

 

Wages Not Counted

 

Do not count wages you pay to any of the following individuals as Social Security and Medicare wages:

 

Your spouse.

 

 

Your child who is under age 21.

 

 

Your parent.

 

 

Note: However, you should count wages to your parent if both of the following apply: (a) your child lives with you and is either under age 18 or has a physical or mental condition that requires the personal care of an adult for at least four continuous weeks in a calendar quarter, and (b) you are divorced and have not remarried, or you are a widow or widower, or you are married to and living with a person whose physical or mental condition prevents him or her from caring for your child for at least four continuous weeks in a calendar quarter.

 

 

An employee who is under age 18 at any time during the year.

 

 

Note: However, you should count these wages to an employee under 18 if providing household services is the employee's principal occupation. If the employee is a student, providing household services is not considered to be his or her principal occupation.

 

Also, if your employee's Social Security and Medicare wages reach $117,00 in 2014 ($113,700 in 2013), then do not count any wages you pay that employee during the rest of the year as Social Security wages to figure Social Security tax. You should however, continue to count the employee's cash wages as Medicare wages to figure Medicare tax. You figure federal income tax withholding on both cash and non-cash wages (based on their value), but do not count as wages any of the following items:

 

 - Meals provided at your home for your convenience.

 

 - Lodging provided at your home for your convenience and as a condition of employment.

 

 - Up to $130 a month in 2014 for transit passes that you give your employee or, in some cases, for cash reimbursement you make for the amount your employee pays to commute to your home by public transit. A transit pass includes any pass, token, fare card, voucher, or similar item entitling a person to ride on mass transit, such as a bus or train.

 

 - Up to $250 a month in 2014 to reimburse your employee for the cost of parking at or near your home or at or near a location from which your employee commutes to your home.

 

As you can see, tax considerations for household employees are complex. Therefore, we highly recommend professional tax guidance in these complicated matters. This is definitely an area where it's better to be safe than sorry, so if you have any questions at all, please contact us. We're happy to assist you.

 


 

    Financial Services at Sullivan & Company, CPAs

Kathy Grow leads our Financial Services Division and is here to help you navigate your financial future. As an Investment Advisor Representative, she is able to provide an independent opinion on the investments you already own or are considering buying.

 

We can structure a portfolio based on your risk tolerance or we can help you decide how to invest in your company 401(k) plan. We work with each client to identify their concerns and to provide solutions according to their situation.

Kathy is also experienced in company retirement plans. If you own a business that does not have a plan; we can discuss your options and set up a plan that fits your company.

 

If your business already has a plan; we offer a free evaluation of the plan to ensure that it is up to date and working well for you and your employees.

Our goal is to provide personal, unbiased and independent advice to help you make well-informed decisions about your financial life and investments.

Contact Kathy Grow or Jordana Para to set up a free initial consultation (301) 657-8080.

And as always if you have any questions about accounting or investments and how they effect you or your business, please give us a call at (240) 316-3564. We can help guide you in the right direction.

 


 

Remember you can call our offices if you have any questions about these or any other accounting, tax, financial planning or insurance related issues, at 301-657-8080. 

 

Regards, Paul Sullivan, CPA

President, Sullivan & Company

 

 

 

 

Sullivan & Company, CPAs | 4709 Montgomery Lane | Bethesda, MD 20814 www.eSullivan.net | email: pSullivan@eSullivan.net | Connect With Me on Linkedin

Direct: 240-316-3531 | Main no.: 301-657-8080 Ext 102 | Fax: 301-657-9055